• High Glitz Pageant Hairstyles Viewing Gallery
  • Kids Hairstyle: Curly Blonde Kids Hairstyles, curly hair ...
  • фото руки родителей и младенца
  • Amber Tamblyn | Photo Sexy Girls

High Glitz Pageant Hairstyles - Viewing Gallery Kids Hairstyle: Curly Blonde Kids Hairstyles, curly hair, фото руки родителей и младенца Amber Tamblyn | Photo Sexy Girls

Presents a comprehensive guide to maintaining and styling hair for girls, including guidelines for identifying hair type, instructions on hair maintenance and products, and tips for hair styles and cuts.

The Curly Girl manifesto is back, now completely revised, updated, and expanded by more than a third with all-new material. Created by curly hair evangelist Lorraine Massey—the go-to curl expert featured in Allure, InStyle, Lucky, Seventeen, and The New York Times; and founder of several curly salons and curly products in New York City—Curly Girl is the surprising bible for the 65 percent of women with naturally curly or wavy hair and a desire to celebrate it. Curly Girl is packed with unique and fail-proof hair-care methods, inspiration, and an empowering pro-curl attitude. It’s all here: daily routines for Botticelli, fractal, and wavy curls; Lorraine’s no-more-shampoo epiphany—handle your hair as gently as you do your best cashmere sweater; homemade lotions and potions. New to this edition: an illustrated, step-by-step guide to trimming your own hair (remember: it’s not what you take off; it’s what you leave on); a section on the particular needs of wavy hair; Lorraine’s Down-and-Dirty Curly Boy Routine; more fabulous ’dos for weddings and other special occasions; a chapter on multicurltural hair written by an African American specialist. Plus, updated information on green and chemical-free products, 20 new Q&As, and a DVD with tutorials on caring for four different types of curls. From now on, there’s no such thing as a bad hair day.

What are you going to do with your children's hair? Combing your daughter's hair is giving you a headache and now your son is asking you for cornrows. Relax. Finally, there's a lifeline for those who are desperately seeking help in styling their Black children's hair. Learn the tricks and techniques for today's most popular hairstyles with the easy-to-follow steps found in It's All Good Hair. It features hair-care and styling tips from a variety of experts, and you'll learn all the secrets to braiding, relaxing, and locking, as well as discover many other creative styling ideas. Say good-bye to those disastrous attempts at doing it alone. Here's the support you need to help your children look good and feel their very best.

Thoroughly modern and atypically witty, this keepsake edition overflows with insight that is occasionally time-honored (There is no substitute for baking soda), sometimes tactical (Anytime you are debating whether to shower or not, take the shower), and other times incredibly profound (When something tragic happens to someone you care about, do not ignore them just because you don't know what to say). This primer of 500 lessons, observations, and knowledge--originally compiled for the author's baby girl--is a compelling guide to finding beauty in the world and in oneself, with a distinctly fresh twist.

It's time for Birdie's very first haircut, and the miniature fashionista yearns for more than just a simple trim. Should she choose an updo, a perm, or a ballerina bun? She looks through pictures, books, lots of magazines - even Mommy's yearbook - to find the best new look, and she and Mommy head to the salon. Her haircut looks fantastic, but begins to sag later on at the playground... because Birdie doesn't just love fashion - she likes to run and jump and play! In the end, Mommy reminds her that the most perfect Birdie look is the one that lets her be herself. Sujean Rim's beautiful watercolor and fabric collages will have fashionistas of every age giggling as she showcases Birdie with iconic hairstyles from decades past. Another delightful adventure in the Birdie series that offers a playful balance of fashion, fun, and heart!

A modern twist on the classic hairstyle! From a Dutch Braided Headband to a Triple Fishtail Braid, DIY Braids will get you noticed! Featuring easy-to-follow instructions and helpful tips from popular beauty and fashion expert Sasha Coefield, this book shows you how to create one-of-a-kind hairstyles without ever stepping inside an expensive salon. Sasha shares all her secrets for creating and wearing her braided looks, including how to prep your hair, master traditional techniques, and enhance your look with fun accessories. Whether you're looking for a chic braid for your next shopping trip or a hairstyle that will really impress your date, this guide gives you plenty of gorgeous options for both day and night. Complete with step-by-step photographs so that you can get the perfect look every time, DIY Braids will have you saying goodbye to your hairdresser--and hello to fashion-forward braids at home in no time!

A bright, bold and inventive picture book by award-winning duo Neil Gaiman and Dave Mckean, featuring a father and daughter and some insanely wild hairstyles.

Celebrates the joy and beauty of nappy hair.

A beautifully photographed instructional book of braiding and hair styles for girls up to thirteen years old. Includes complete directions for making your own barrettes and hair ornaments with the goodies provided.

Little Women of Baghlan is the true account of an ordinary young woman who answers the call to service and adventure during an extraordinary time in world history. Her story rivals the excitement, intrigue, and suspense of any novel, unfolding against the backdrop of changing social mores, the Cold War, the Peace Corps, and a country at the crossroads of China, Russia, India, Pakistan, and Iran. When John F. Kennedy, delivers a speech in the Senate Chambers on a hot July day in 1957, a young girl named Joanne Carter listens from the Senate gallery. Ten years later Kennedy has been assassinated and America is mired in the Vietnam War. Jo remembers Kennedy’s words and is inspired to join the Peace Corps. She flies into Afghanistan on March 21, 1968. From her plane window, the Hindu Kush Mountains appear desolate and barren, not unlike the surface of the moon. On the ground, Kabul explodes into color and sound. Taxis honk. Busses spew diesel fumes, sharing traffic lanes with donkeys and camels. The air is infused with the aroma of wool, dust, and dung. As the Volunteers tour the Blue Mosque in Mazar-e Sharif, three Russian MIGS buzz the courtyard, foreshadowing the Soviet invasion of 1989. With co-workers Nan and Mary, Jo starts a school of nursing for Afghan girls. The students are almost non-literate. The hospital lacks equipment, trained doctors, and a reliable source of water. Babies routinely expire from poor delivery practices. On Christmas Eve 1968, Jo walks the frozen mud streets of Baghlan. Overhead, the Apollo 8 astronauts orbit the moon. In January, the women travel on vacation to India, prompting the Peace Corps director in Kabul to dub them the “Little Women of Baghlan.” They make a stop at Peshawar Air Base in Pakistan, and Jo attracts the attention of a handsome, charismatic airman. When they return, Jo reflects on the paradox that is Afghanistan. The Afghans are mired in poverty, yet generous to the point of embarrassment. The men are welcoming and solicitous of the Volunteers, yet capable of turning a blind eye to the suffering of their wives, daughters, and sisters. The climate is harsh and unforgiving; the Hindu Kush starkly beautiful. During her two-year deployment, Jo fills the pages of a small, compact diary, never dreaming her tiny handwriting will eventually become a significant historical account. Nearly a half century later, her journal is a bittersweet reminder of a country that has since vanished—a country on the brink of becoming a modern nation, moving toward the recognition of women’s rights. The Volunteers live in safety. They celebrate the end of the holy month of Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr with their Afghan hosts; the Muslims bring a Christmas tree to their American guests. The Peace Corps workers are long gone, replaced by Soviet troops in 1979, mujahideen fighters ten years later, the Taliban in 1996, and the United States military in 2001, joined by NATO forces in 2003. Afghanistan is no longer the name of a country, it is the name of a war. The country Jo once called home has been buried under layers of recent history, and there is little evidence to suggest that such a time or place ever existed.

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