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She didn’t hatch out of an eagle’s nest, circa One Million Years B.C., clad in a skimpy fur bikini. She didn’t aspire to fame as a sex symbol. Yet, for many years after making her Hollywood entrance as every man’s fantasy, Raquel Welch was best known for her beauty and sex appeal. A private person, she allowed people to draw their own conclusions from her public image. Now, Raquel Welch is ready to speak her mind. And, with the luxury of hindsight and the benefit of experience, she has plenty to share about the art of being a woman—even men will find it enlightening to read about what makes her tick. In Beyond the Cleavage, Raquel Welch talks, woman to woman, about her views on all that comes with being a member of the female sex—love, sex, style, health, body image, career, family, forgiveness, aging, and coming of age. Looking back on her life, she lets women in on her childhood, dominated by a volatile father; her first love, marriage, and divorce; her early struggles as a single working mother in Hollywood; her battles for roles and respect as an actress; and her daring decision never to lie about her age. Looking forward, she offers women a compass to guide them at every crossroad of life, from menopause through the empty nest years, to dating younger men and beyond. Along with bringing baby boomers into her confidence—she offers essential tips for staying motivated and positive past fifty, as well as divulging her secrets for fabulous hair and makeup—she even talks to today’s younger generation of women about the importance of carrying themselves with dignity and self-respect. With warmth, humor, conviction, and honesty, Raquel reveals her approach to preventative aging, her life-changing commitment to yoga, her recipe for eating right, her skincare regimen, her flair for fashion, and much more. Deeply personal (Welch wrote every word herself—no ghostwriter), Beyond the Cleavage is Raquel Welch’s gift to every woman who longs to look and feel her best, and be at peace with herself.

Brian W. Fairbanks, Entertainment Editor at Paris Woman Journal in Paris, France, "has a talent for extracting the essence of a given subject and articulating it in a meaningful way."In I SAW THAT MOVIE, TOO, he extracts the essence from several hundred films, and articulates some of the most meaningful opinions on the cinema you'll ever read. In the foreword, he also offers a perceptive analysis of the way that movies, more importantly, the way we "see" movies, has changed from the time he was a young movie buff "obsessed by that light in the darkness" to the era of the multiplex and the DVD.As one reader says, he has "a sophisticated yet effortlessly readable style." Smart, insightful, always honest, but never pretentious, Fairbanks is a life-long film buff who backs up his opinions with a knowledge of both the art and artifice of cinema.

Science Fiction is probably the most popular box office genre in movie history and has given filmgoers some of their most memorable cinematic experiences. Outer Limits takes its readers on a tour of the sci-fi cinema universe in all its fantastical, celestial glory. The milestone films of sci-fi cinema from Metropolis to Avatar are discussed in this Filmgoers' Guide for anyone who enjoys a cinema that has pleased and amazed filmgoers since the dawn of cinema. Illustrated with fine examples of sci-fi film poster-art, Outer Limits goes deep into the most interesting and popular movies across sci-fi cinema's many forms, with core chapters used as launch pads to discuss lesser-known influential movies and follow-on sequels. Howard Hughes tells the stories from pre-production to box office returns of The War of the Worlds, Independence Day, Tarantula, Godzilla, The Time Machine, The Thing, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Forbidden Planet, Barbarella, Galaxy Quest, Minority Report, Planet of the Apes, Mad Max 2, Back to the Future, Alien, Terminator 2: Judgement Day, The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Matrix, Star Trek, Apollo 13, Blade Runner and many more.

Challenges feminist beliefs that the fashion and beauty industry objectifies women, contending that elite women are out of touch with most women in the U.S. while arguing that fashion is more an expression of creativity and identity than a means of attracting men. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.

"This book is written for those executives who really want to have a leaner organization...it is also written for the leaders of young businesses who want to grow up lean & stay lean." ...From the Introduction, "The book is full of good everyday common sense in easy to understand form. I really enjoyed reading the entire book...& would recommend it to anyone but especially to my managerial staff."--Morris Jarvis, CEO, Hancock Fabrics Inc. "I like the many practical tips that are usable in day-to-day decisions...gives the reader insights into the mindset required to be a truly low cost operator."--Dave Bronstein, CEO, Big V Supermarkets, Inc. "This book has the potential to start a prairie fire of concern for cost awareness & competitiveness."--Jeff Hamren, General Partner, Crown Advisors Ltd.

Street Cop is the exciting story of one man's career in Law Enforcement. David Spell joined the Gwinnett County Police Department in 1984 at the tender age of twenty-one. This fast moving narrative takes the reader inside the squad car with David as he patrols some of the most dangerous areas and neighborhoods in Metro Atlanta. If you like the TV show Cops, you will love Street Cop. Get ready for your tour of duty. Strap into the passenger seat of David's squad car and enjoy the car chases, foot chases, fights, murder investigations, and other assorted crazy calls. You are about to see first-hand what it is really like on America's mean streets!

TV drama both reflects and contributes to the production of cultural identity. At a time of deep cultural uncertainty, how has this been represented within the programmes that contribute to our own sense of identity? This volume addresses the question, in relation to issues of social class, ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality and national/diaspora identity. Particular attention is paid to the changing profile of British television drama over the last 35 years: • the increasing fragmentation of the home audience, • the transnationalisation of media culture, • the increasingly hybrid nature of programme formats, and • the popularity of US series within a British viewing context. Programme examples are drawn from a range of dramatic formats: comedy, crime/hospital dramas, literary adaptations, political dramas, TV films, 'sit coms' and soap operas including:• ER • The Buddha of Suburbia • The X-Files • Father Ted • Driving School • Diana: Her True Story • EastEnders • The Cops • Friends This is the first book to give a comprehensive coverage of all the major debates within the field of TV drama while considering current programming in terms of the move away from the public service model of broadcasting as a whole.

Polly Adler's "house"--the brothel that gave this best-selling 1953 autobiography its title--was a major site of New York City underworld activity from the 1920s through the 1940s. Adler's notorious Lexington Avenue house of prostitution functioned as a sort of social club for New York's gangsters and a variety of other celebrities, including Robert Benchley and his friend Dorothy Parker. According to one New York tabloid, it made Adler's name "synonymous with sin." This new edition of Adler's autobiography brings back into print a book that was a mass phenomenon, in both hardback and paperback, when it was first published. A self-consciously literary work, A House Is Not a Home provides an informal social history of immigrant mobility, prostitution, Jewish life in New York, police dishonesty, the "white slavery" scare of the early twentieth century, and political corruption. Adler's story fills an important gap in the history of immigrant life, urban experience, and organized crime in New York City. While most other accounts of the New York underworld focus on the lives of men, from Herbert Asbury's Gangs of New York through more recent works on Jewish and Italian gangsters, this book brings women's lives and problems to the forefront. A House Is Not a Home is compellingly readable and was popular enough to draw Hollywood's attention in the early 1960s--leading to a film starring Shelley Winters as Adler. The book has been largely forgotten in the ensuing decades, lost both to its initial audience of general readers and to scholars in women's studies, immigration history, and autobiography who are likely to find it a treasure trove. Now, with a new introduction by Rachel Rubin that contextualizes Adler's life and literary achievement, A House Is Not a Home is again available to the many readers who have come to understand such "marginal" life stories as a special refraction of the more typical American success narrative.

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