• Oh my braids
  • black-white-silver-red-matric-farewell-nails-with-dress ...
  • black prince w sword wearing ceremonial helmet
  • From Beach To Street: 70+ Trending Ways Inspire Your ...

Oh my braids black-white-silver-red-matric-farewell-nails-with-dress, black prince w sword wearing ceremonial helmet From Beach To Street: 70+ Trending Ways Inspire Your ...

First published in 1973, the new third edition of ACCENT AFRICAN: Traditional and Contemporary Hairstyles for the Black Woman, contains color and black and white photos of over 72 Cornrows, Braids, Locs, Interlocs, African Twists, Nubian Twists and Corkscrew styles. Step by step instructions are included for many designs, along with information on How to Add Extensions and Tips on Hair Grooming. Hairstyles for young children and men are also featured in this edition. Only $8.95.

"Black Hair" celebrates the diversity and creativity of black women's hairstyles, from traditional African ceremonial styles to sleek trendy hairdos. Stories, nonfiction anecdotes, historical details, and poems from some of the finest African-American writers amplify this one-of-a-kind pictorial collection. 100 illustrations.

'Many Globalizations' is an attempt to account for the cultural impact of globalisation in the lives of ordinary citizens from ten countries. The results of the study portray vast numbers of people intermixing participation in a global economy with indigenous values and lifestyles.

Elizabeth Johnson's Resistance and Empowerment in Black Women's Hair Styling develops the argument that one way Black women define themselves and each other, is by the way they style/groom their hair via endorsement by the media through advertisement, idealized identification of Black female celebrities, and encouragement by professional celebrity hair stylists who serve as change agents. As a result, hair becomes a physical manifestation of their self-identity, revealing a private and personal mindset. Her research answers the following questions: What is the relationship between Black females' choice of hairstyles/grooming and transmitted messages of aesthetics by the dominant culture through culturally specific magazines?; What role do the natural hair blogs/vlogs play as a change agent in encouraging or discouraging consumers grooming their hair in its natural state?; What impact does a globalized consumer market of Black hair care products have on Hispanic/Latinas and Bi-Racial women?; Are Black female Generation Y members more likely to receive backlash for failure to conform their hair to dominant standards in their hair adornment in the workplace? Johnson thus demonstrates that the major concern from messages sent to Black women about their hair is its impact on Black identity. Thus, the goal of Black women should be to break with hegemonic modes of seeing, thinking, and being for full liberation. This critical and deep consciousness will debunk the messages told to Black women that their kinky, frizzy, thick hair is undesirable, bad, unmanageable, and shackling.

Previous work discussing Black beauty has tended to concentrate on Black women's search for white beauty as a consequence of racialization. Without denying either the continuation of such aesthetics or their enduring power, this book uncovers the cracks in this hegemonic Black beauty. Drawing on detailed ethnographic research amongst British women of Caribbean heritage, this volume pursues a broad discussion of beauty within the Black diaspora contexts of the Caribbean, the UK, the United States and Latin America through different historical periods to the present day. With a unique exploration of beauty, race and identity politics, the author reveals how Black women themselves speak about, negotiate, inhabit, work on and perform Black beauty. As such, it will appeal not only to sociologists, but anyone working in the fields of race, ethnicity and post-colonial thought, feminism and the sociology of the body.

Collection of Black women’s stories that show how leadership values are transmitted from mothers to daughters

How representations of interracial desire create authentic blackness

A study of relations between black and white adolescents in South London.

'Hairstyles' is an honest depiction of growing up punk on Chicago's south side: a study in the demons of racial intolerance, Catholic school conformism and class repression. It is the story of the riotous exploits of Brian, a high school burnout, and his best friend Gretchen, a punk rock girl fond of brawling. Joe Meno won the 2003 Nelson Algren Literary Award and is the author of 'Tender as Hellfire' (St. Martin's, 1999) and 'How the Hula Girl Sings' (HarperCollins, 2001). His online fictional serial, 'The Secret Hand', is published through 'Playboy Magazine'. His short fiction has been published in 'TriQuarterly', 'Bridge', 'Other Voices Washington Square', and has been broadcast on National Public Radio. He lives in Chicago, and he is a columnist for 'Punk Planet' magazine.

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