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'Hairstyles' is an honest depiction of growing up punk on Chicago's south side: a study in the demons of racial intolerance, Catholic school conformism and class repression. It is the story of the riotous exploits of Brian, a high school burnout, and his best friend Gretchen, a punk rock girl fond of brawling. Joe Meno won the 2003 Nelson Algren Literary Award and is the author of 'Tender as Hellfire' (St. Martin's, 1999) and 'How the Hula Girl Sings' (HarperCollins, 2001). His online fictional serial, 'The Secret Hand', is published through 'Playboy Magazine'. His short fiction has been published in 'TriQuarterly', 'Bridge', 'Other Voices Washington Square', and has been broadcast on National Public Radio. He lives in Chicago, and he is a columnist for 'Punk Planet' magazine.

Recent debate around the potential decriminalization of marijuana, along with a growing perception that illicit drug use is on the rise, has brought the role of the state in controlling intoxication to the forefront of public discussion. Until now, however, there has been little scholarly consideration of the legal and social regulation of drug use in Canada. In The Real Dope, Edgar-Andre Montigny brings together leading scholars from a diverse range of fields—including history, law, political science, criminology, and psychology—to examine the relationship between moral judgment and legal regulation. Highlights of this collection include rare glimpses into how LSD, cocaine, and ecstasy have historically been treated by authority figures. Other topics explored range from anti-smoking campaigns and addiction treatment to the relationship between ethnicity and liquor control. Readers will find intriguing links across arguments and disciplines, providing a much-needed foundation for meaningful discussion.

The deluxe eBook edition of stand-up comedian and WNYC podcaster Phoebe Robinson’s You Can’t Touch My Hair brings Phoebe’s hilarious voice off the page, directly into your eyes and ears. This enhanced edition features exclusive video footage with cameos by some of Phoebe’s comedy besties, plus more than an hour of audio where Phoebe talks regrettable crushes from the 90s, advice she wishes someone had given her as a teenager, the influence of RuPaul, and much more. Delivered in her signature style, Phoebe serves laughter and levity alongside more serious topics at rapid-fire speeds, topped—as always—with pop culture references for days. A hilarious and timely essay collection about race, gender, and pop culture from upcoming comedy superstar and 2 Dope Queens podcaster Phoebe Robinson Being a black woman in America means contending with old prejudices and fresh absurdities every day. Comedian Phoebe Robinson has experienced her fair share over the years: she's been unceremoniously relegated to the role of "the black friend," as if she is somehow the authority on all things racial; she's been questioned about her love of U2 and Billy Joel ("isn’t that . . . white people music?"); she's been called "uppity" for having an opinion in the workplace; she's been followed around stores by security guards; and yes, people do ask her whether they can touch her hair all. the. time. Now, she's ready to take these topics to the page—and she’s going to make you laugh as she’s doing it. Using her trademark wit alongside pop-culture references galore, Robinson explores everything from why Lisa Bonet is "Queen. Bae. Jesus," to breaking down the terrible nature of casting calls, to giving her less-than-traditional advice to the future female president, and demanding that the NFL clean up its act, all told in the same conversational voice that launched her podcast, 2 Dope Queens, to the top spot on iTunes. As personal as it is political, You Can't Touch My Hair examines our cultural climate and skewers our biases with humor and heart, announcing Robinson as a writer on the rise.

For fans of Johanna Basford's Secret Garden and Enchanted Forest comes a hip, gorgeous doodle coloring book about all things hair. Unlike other adult coloring books, which depict nature scenes and cityscapes, this title celebrates strong, confident women with a passion for style, design, and fashion. Revel in the mesmerizing patterns and intricate details of Andrea Pippins's delicate pen-and-ink illustrations, ready for you to color, complete, and embellish. Lose yourself in page after page of bold hairstyles and accessories, from rows of braids, to Mohawks, to sweeping updos, to cascades of ribbons and beads. Be transported to another world as you ink in Medusa's slithering coiffure, Cleopatra's elaborate headdress, and Marie Antoinette's towering bouffant. Perfect for experienced color-inners and newcomers alike. Coloring enthusiasts of all ages will love this empowering and stylish book. So go ahead--let your hair down, grab some pens or pencils, and add some color to your life. "Pippins's imaginative images will inspire your inner artist and fashionista." --The Huffington Post "The girl power stress-reliever we all needed." --Bustle

Notorious as much for its fashion as for its music, the 1960s and 1970s produced provocative fashion trends that reflected the rising wave of gender politics and the sexual revolution. In an era when gender stereotypes were questioned and dismantled, and when the feminist and gay rights movements were gaining momentum and a voice, the fashion industry responded in kind. Designers from Paris to Hollywood imagined a future of equality and androgyny. The unisex movement affected all ages, with adult fashions trickling down to school-aged children and clothing for infants. Between 1965 and 1975, girls and women began wearing pants to school; boys enjoyed a brief "peacock revolution," sporting bold colors and patterns; and legal battles were fought over hair style and length. However, with the advent of Diane Von Furstenberg’s wrap dress and the launch of Victoria's Secret, by the mid-1980s, unisex styles were nearly completely abandoned. Jo B. Paoletti traces the trajectory of unisex fashion against the backdrop of the popular issues of the day—from contraception access to girls' participation in sports. Combing mass-market catalogs, newspaper and magazine articles, cartoons, and trade publications for signs of the fashion debates, Paoletti provides a multigenerational study of the "white space" between (or beyond) masculine and feminine.

“Here is truth-telling at its most exemplary and courageous. The remorseless exercise of a reporter’s anguished conscience gives us a South Africa we thought we knew all about: but we knew nothing.” —John le Carré My Traitor’s Heart is an astonishing work of reportage, at once beautiful, horrifying, and profound—a book unlike any other about South Africa. Rian Malan is an Afrikaner, scion of a centuries-old clan deeply involved in the creation of apartheid. As a young crime reporter, Malan covered the atrocities of an undeclared race war and ultimately fled the country, unhinged by what he had seen. Eight years later, he returns to confront his own demons, and those that are tearing his country apart. Written in the final years of apartheid’s bloody collapse, My Traitor’s Heart still resonates, offering a chilling—but ultimately redemptive—vision of the darkest recesses of the black and white South African psyches.

Taking its name from a fortification established more than 160 years ago during the Second Seminole War, Fort Lauderdale boasts a history stretching back 5,000 years before the first white settlers arrived in the eighteenth century. From beautiful tales of the "mysterious" New River that helped launch the community to more recent stories of rum running and gambling, segregation and integration, and boom and bust, the history of this Florida city is told here through the everyday lives of those who lived it.

From the Gutter to the Grave is an action filled urban tale that will for sure keep readers‘minds in suspense and fingers anxiously ready to flip the next page. With realistic street dialogue such as that used in favorite successful urban novels like, The Coldest Winter Ever by Sister Souljah and Be More Careful by Shannon Holmes, this awesome tale takes one on a wild and vivid journey to a place that other authors seldom lead readers. Through the real ghetto! Written with specificity of ethnic characterized scheme, the general readers of this type novel would in all probability be that of an African-American-Latino audience, but with a plot so alluring and dramatized, the heading multicultural could in fact to be used when categorizing FTGTTG. The author, G.C. Deuce establishes and introduces the main character as Terrance Brown, whom throughout the narrative is referred to by the moniker ‘Trech’, a 19 year old man of African American and Puerto Rican descent, who like many his age finds himself encountering several controversial and combative disputes attributed from living within an impoverished, violent, drug infested community and dysfunctional household. Being raised up in an unbalanced home life consisting of prostitution, drug abuse, imprisonment, and other immoral standards, Trech not only learned to survive but also took heed while facing day to day grueling situations, beginning at his residence. Considering all the disadvantages, he coped well and harnessed the skill of maintaining and compensating for any given circumstance that would arise and with astute planning when necessary to continue surviving and protecting his loved ones. With one brother in the grave and another incarcerated, Trech finds himself trapped within the same environment which played a major part in the destruction of his family. He gradually takes on the roll of “savior” as he links up with three of his closest blood cousins whom all just like him sadly suffer from the same plights associated with slum living. Showing great leadership potential, Trech devises a plan to save his family as well as himself from the struggle’s suffocating grip. With help from his faithful girlfriend and cousins, (except the betrayer) they clad up in police-swat gear with ammunitions and attempt to pull off the lick-of-a-lifetime, only to in the end have their big dreams turn into a horrific nightmare. After the loss of one of his cousins, Trech, along with his remaining family succeed in locking down their city’s drug game; that’s until the jealousy of a long forgotten relative causes him to fall deeper into the violent side of the game. Trech finds himself once again playing the role of “redeemer” but this time it’s his beloved girlfriend he must rescue from the envious haters dwelling in the streets of the hood. The climax of the story illustrates Trech, and close acquaintances rescuing his girl from a murderous back stabbing cousin, bringing the encounter to what they assumed was definitely the end. After which, boarding a peaceful one-way flight to California with his girl and her young sister, Trech finally believes he has truly been set free from the game, but little does he know that the next five years of his life would be closely monitored by a man that he’d watched die from a fatal gunshot. California soon becomes introduced to a new breed of gangsters when Trech’s cousin resurfaces and takes command of one of Cali’s most infamous gangs while keeping a close eye on his detested relative. Trech soon finds himself being blindly haunted by visions of the past! From the Gutter to the Grave fits perfectly in the category of other favorite writings like Dutch by Terry Woods and A Hustler’s Wife by Nikki Turner. This intriguing story consists of three different parts, each exposing the reader to a more diverse setting of events with a variety of character

A focused multisited cultural analysis that reflects on the symbiotic relationship between the local, the national, and the global

A stand-alone sequel to the Time magazine Best Book American Tabloid and the Los Angeles Times Best Book The Cold Six Thousand traces the 1968 collision of a Klan-raised FBI agent, an ex-cop heroin runner and a divorce lawyer front-man with ties to the Kennedy assassinations. Reprint. A best-selling novel.

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