• December | 2015 | Long Hairstyles 2015 & Long Haircuts ...
  • Box Braid Bob The Bob Box Braids! – Estherotomi Women ...
  • Kinky Curly Hair! Affordable YouTube
  • Best 20+ Balayage black hair ideas on Pinterest | Dark ...

December | 2015 | Long Hairstyles 2015 & Long Haircuts, Box Braid Bob The Bob Box Braids! – Estherotomi - Women, Kinky Curly Hair! Affordable - YouTube Best 20+ Balayage black hair ideas on Pinterest | Dark ...

The Curly Girl manifesto is back, now completely revised, updated, and expanded by more than a third with all-new material. Created by curly hair evangelist Lorraine Massey—the go-to curl expert featured in Allure, InStyle, Lucky, Seventeen, and The New York Times; and founder of several curly salons and curly products in New York City—Curly Girl is the surprising bible for the 65 percent of women with naturally curly or wavy hair and a desire to celebrate it. Curly Girl is packed with unique and fail-proof hair-care methods, inspiration, and an empowering pro-curl attitude. It’s all here: daily routines for Botticelli, fractal, and wavy curls; Lorraine’s no-more-shampoo epiphany—handle your hair as gently as you do your best cashmere sweater; homemade lotions and potions. New to this edition: an illustrated, step-by-step guide to trimming your own hair (remember: it’s not what you take off; it’s what you leave on); a section on the particular needs of wavy hair; Lorraine’s Down-and-Dirty Curly Boy Routine; more fabulous ’dos for weddings and other special occasions; a chapter on multicurltural hair written by an African American specialist. Plus, updated information on green and chemical-free products, 20 new Q&As, and a DVD with tutorials on caring for four different types of curls. From now on, there’s no such thing as a bad hair day.

Previous work discussing Black beauty has tended to concentrate on Black women's search for white beauty as a consequence of racialization. Without denying either the continuation of such aesthetics or their enduring power, this book uncovers the cracks in this hegemonic Black beauty. Drawing on detailed ethnographic research amongst British women of Caribbean heritage, this volume pursues a broad discussion of beauty within the Black diaspora contexts of the Caribbean, the UK, the United States and Latin America through different historical periods to the present day. With a unique exploration of beauty, race and identity politics, the author reveals how Black women themselves speak about, negotiate, inhabit, work on and perform Black beauty. As such, it will appeal not only to sociologists, but anyone working in the fields of race, ethnicity and post-colonial thought, feminism and the sociology of the body.

Two world wars, the Civil Rights movement, and a Jheri curl later, Blacks in America continue to have a complex and convoluted relationship with their hair. From the antebellum practice of shaving the head in an attempt to pass as a "free" person to the 1998 uproar over a White third-grade teacher's reading of the book Nappy Hair, the issues surrounding African American hair continue to linger as we enter the twenty-first century. Hair Story is a historical and anecdotal exploration of Black Americans' tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture and politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from fifteenth-century Africa to the present-day United States, it ties the personal to the political and the popular. Read about: * Why Black American slaves used items like axle grease and eel skin to straighten their hair. * How a Mexican chemist straightened Black hair using his formula for turning sheep's wool into a minklike fur. * How the Afro evolved from militant style to mainstream fashion trend. * What prompted the creation of the Jheri curl and the popular style's fall from grace. * The story behind Bo Derek's controversial cornrows and the range of reactions they garnered. Major figures in the history of Black hair are presented, from early hair-care entrepreneurs Annie Turnbo Malone and Madam C. J. Walker to unintended hair heroes like Angela Davis and Bob Marley. Celebrities, stylists, and cultural critics weigh in on the burgeoning sociopolitical issues surrounding Black hair, from the historically loaded terms "good" and "bad" hair, to Black hair in the workplace, to mainstream society's misrepresentation and misunderstanding of kinky locks. Hair Story is the book that Black Americans can use as a benchmark for tracing a unique aspect of their history, and it's a book that people of all races will celebrate as the reference guide for understanding Black hair.

1992 was a pivotal moment in African American history, with the Rodney King riots providing palpable evidence of racialized police brutality, media stereotyping of African Americans, and institutional discrimination. Following the twentieth anniversary of the Los Angeles uprising, this time period allows reflection on the shifting state of race in America, considering these stark realities as well as the election of the country's first black president, a growing African American middle class, and the black authors and artists significantly contributing to America's cultural output. Divided into six sections, (The African American Criminal in Culture and Media; Slave Voices and Bodies in Poetry and Plays; Representing African American Gender and Sexuality in Pop-Culture and Society; Black Cultural Production in Music and Dance; Obama and the Politics of Race; and Ongoing Realities and the Meaning of 'Blackness') this book is an engaging collection of chapters, varied in critical content and theoretical standpoints, linked by their intellectual stimulation and fascination with African American life, and questioning how and to what extent American culture and society is 'past' race. The chapters are united by an intertwined sense of progression and regression which addresses the diverse dynamics of continuity and change that have defined shifts in the African American experience over the past twenty years.

EBONY is the flagship magazine of Johnson Publishing. Founded in 1945 by John H. Johnson, it still maintains the highest global circulation of any African American-focused magazine.

In My Life in England: Dream Come True or Ruin? Ms. Ntsoaki Mary Mosoeunyane chronicles her journey across continents and cultural obstacles in search of a successful life. She confronts racial discrimination and stark societal differences that shakes the foundation of who she is and what she cherishes. Mosoeunyane’s conversational tone and rattling honesty take the reader on a walk in her shoes, seeing through her eyes the world as it has unfolded before her. My Life in England is a tale firmly rooted in the value of strong relationships, the power of positive thinking, and the determination of one woman to overcome life’s challenges.

BLS EV: Black Life Supremacy Truthful Blackness of Living, For Greater Self-Esteem Poetical Quoting Volume 3 eVersion aka eBook. It’s for those who really desire to get into the words of note inscribed for the digital age of electronic books: This version carries the same intensity and passion as the printed paperback copy; except for the spectrum visual layout of the words on poetical notations: Nevertheless, for those literary beings having this ebook on their smart phones and tablets gives a quick access to the author’s poetic sharing on some of the keen observations regarding life from a divine black prospective: The works shared are to stimulate greater appreciation onto the surrounding scopes of divine blackness from the night to the day:

Translated by Teresa Mlawer.

Describes the cultural, historical, and scientific aspects of hairdressing and hairstyling throughout history.

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